Cab Proprietors

The coach evidently reached South Africa at an early stage, because Simon van der Stel travelled in one when he led an expedition to Namaqualand in 1685 in search of copper. The Dutch coach of his time was a heavy four-wheeled vehicle with a leather-covered and brass-studded body. The undercarriage was like that of the wagon, with four upright posts from which the body was suspended on leather straps. A coachman's seat was fitted above the front wheels and a team of up to six horses drew the vehicle, the leaders being controlled by a postilion who rode one of them.

Cemetery Project for School Children

A wonderful classroom project for teachers to explain to children the importance of cemeteries and not to be afraid of visiting them. Also why cemeteries have different sections as well as understanding the circumstances on reasons for deaths in a certain year - these are just a few things that are covered in this lesson.

The Emigrants Guide to South Africa

The Emigrants Guide to South Africa is a comprehensive guide published in 1880 specifically for British residents who would like to live in South Africa. It provides a list of the fleet of ships names. Details on what was available on board, how much luggage each person is allowed, no alcohol allowed by passengers to be taken on board - their is ample available, cost of fare, menu descriptions and basically a fascinating insight to what your ancestors life would have been on their long voyage to South Africa

  • Rondebosch-Westerford

Rondebosch Down the Years 1657 – 1957

Rondebosch, untamed as it was in 1657, those early settlers fell in love with its streams and glades and mountain-slopes, and with the wonderful shelter it afforded from the turbulent winds that harassed them in Cape Town. The progress of three centuries has so far not dimmed its beauty, though it needs to be guarded jealously in these "flat-ridden" days.

Databases

Transcribed and free genealogy records for South Africa. If you have any transcribed records in excel or csv format that you would like to make available on my website please contact me.

General Register of Native Pupils and Apprentices Lovedale Missionary Institution A – F

Extracted roll of learners from the Lovedale Register prepared by Dr. James Stewart - In the following pages we have accordingly endeavoured -according to the best of our information - to give the individual records of over 2000 natives of South Africa, and also of some hundreds of Europeans who have at different times come for instruction to this place - though the record Europeans is little more than a mere roll at present.

  • Govindasamy-Krishnan

Govindasamy Krishnan

Govindasamy Krishnan was born in Escourt, Natal in 1901 and educated at Pretoria and S.M.H. High School, Shiyali, Tanjore. He left school in response to Mahatma Ghandi's call of non-Co-operation movement and did propaganda work and engaged in business. He was also a teacher at the Tamil school in Pretoria. Amongst many other things he was also the Scout Master of the Pretoria Indian Boys Scouts and awarded the Tamil Vedic Young Men's Association gold medal for invaluable service.

Photographers of the 19th Century in South Africa

Over 200 19th Century South African Photographers have been listed here. Should you have any additional information please contact me or you would like to use this content - please don't copy this material but rather put a link to my website.

Home Remedies of the Cape

A study of the inventories of the people at the Cape, from 1673 to 1826, tells us of their lifestyles and efforts to maintain good health. When we look into their home medicine chests and pharmacy shops, we realise how they relied on prescriptions from the West, spices from the East and indigenous plants, to remedy their illnesses.

Simonstown History

The town was named after Simon van der Stel. Simon's Bay was made the official winter anchorage for the Dutch East India Company's ships in 1743. Baron G. W. van Imhoff, Governor-General of the Dutch East Indies, who touched at the Cape in the same year, chose a site for a magazine, hospital and barracks at Simonstown. A small garrison was stationed there, and when a stone pier was constructed in 1768, a bakery, a slaughter-house, a carpenter's shop and a smithy were erected, as well as a residence for the Governor (who always spent a few days there when the fleet arrived).

  • st marys cathedral

History of St. Mary’s Cathedral

St. Mary's Cathedral, a Roman Catholic Church had its first site purchased as early as 1822 and a small church was built in Harrington Street, Cape Town. In 1837 this building was almost completely destroyed [...]

History of Cycling in South Africa

Bicycle races were held in South Africa some years before Dunlop invented the pneumatic tyre (patented 1888). The first cycling club in Southern Africa the Port Elizabeth Bicycle Club was founded in Oct. 1881, while the [...]

Indentured Sailors of Simonstown

Indentured Sailors of Simontown play an immense role in the history of this Naval village. The relationship of the West African Krooman with the Royal Navy lasted about a hundred years from the early part [...]

Hidden Family Heirlooms

Heirlooms in your family's possession are items or artefacts that are sometimes never spoken about or even viewed, but either hidden from prying eyes or discreetly placed in the home so as not to be seen as too conspicuous to non-family members. These items can sometimes be found listed in wills or they are simply passed down through the generations with admiration and a huge amount of trust ensuring that they do not end up on an auction or in the hands of the wrong person.

The King and I

King Sweyn II of Denmark A number of years ago I was lucky enough to be given a free DNA test. When I had my Mitochondrial DNA test done I discovered that I [...]

Did your Ancestors qualify to vote in South Africa

When the Cape Colony achieved representative government in 1853, all male persons complying with the following qualifications could be registered as voters: those who had occupied, for a period of twelve months, building which alone or with the ground on which it stood was worth at least £25; those who had, for a period of twelve months, earned a salary or wages amounting to at least £50 per annum.

Rose’s Round-Up December 2002 No 107

RESEARCHER STUDIES TENT TORTOISES A Canadian researcher has come to the Karoo to study the common but poorly known tent tortoise. Dr Thomas Leuteritz, a post-doctoral associate of Professor Retha Hofmeyr, of the University of the Western Cape, has set up base at Prince Albert to study the behaviour and breeding biology of Psammobates tentorius, better known as the tent tortoise or "knoppiesdop." The project will run for three months east of Prince Albert at the Tierberg Karoo Research Centre, which is managed by Dr Richard Dean, of the Percy FitzPatrick Institute of the University of Cape Town. To establish [...]

Rose’s Round-Up October 2002 No 105

BY ACCLAIM, A PRINCE OF CHEESES A full-flavoured, well-matured hard cheese made at Prince Albert in the Karoo has walked off with top honours at the South African Farm-Style Cheese Championships run by the National Dairy Institute at Irene. Known as Parma Prince and produced by Gay’s Guernsey Dairy, it won first prize in the Italian-style cheese sector and was also given a special award as an exceptional cheese. The road to success started four years ago when dairy owner Gay van Hasselt visited Italy to promote mohair products of her farm. While there, she visited top parmesan producers to [...]

Rose’s Round-Up September 2002 No 104

A WONDERFUL WORLD OF FOSSILS, SAYS EXPERT “Laingsburg is most fortunate that the world's largest and most complex eurypterid trackway was found right on its doorstep,” said Dr Simon Braddy , University of Bristol, UK, and an expert on the palaeobiology of ancient, extinct water scorpions. "This discovery will bring scientists, researchers, students and lay people to the Karoo, one of the best places in the world to study fossils of the Permian Period. Finds such as this must be included in the region's tourism plans and visitors must be taught to behave responsibly at such sites," said Dr Braddy. [...]

Rose’s Round-Up August 2002 No 103

IT'S HIGH NOON FOR THE RIVERINE RABBIT The odds are stacked against the riverine rabbit surviving another 10 years. It recently became South Africa’s most endangered mammal when its conservation status was raised to critical. "Its survival appears even more desperate than we previously believed," says Cape Nature Conservation researcher Chrizette Kleinhans. "These furry-footed little leaf-eaters, among the world's rarest animals, will disappear from the face of the earth within a decade unless drastic steps are immediately taken." The riverine rabbit is indigenous to the Central Karoo and found only in Beaufort West, Loxton, Carnarvon, Calvinia, Sutherland, Victoria West and [...]

Rose’s Round-Up July 2002 No 102

IN -FLIGHT MAGAZINE HELPS SAVE FOSSIL TREASURE A story in Rose’s Round-up has been instrumental in raising funds to help preserve a fossil treasure of the Great Karoo, the recent find of an invertebrate trackway that could be the most spectacular example of its kind yet found in the world. The news item, covering Laingsburg’s fossil trackway, was noticed and also published by SAA's in-flight magazine, Sawabona, which is how it came to the attention of Professor Peter Spargo and his wife. After reading the story on a flight between Cape Town and Johannesburg they generously offered R1 000 from [...]

Rose’s Round-Up June 2002 No 101

A WINTER LOOK AT THE ANCIENT KAROO Highlight of the Winter School at the S A Museum in Cape Town this year will be a series of lectures entitled Life and Death in the Karoo. Lectures in the T H Barry Hall from July 1 to 4 offer a new look at the Karoo's fossil history. Field sedimentologist and head of palaeontology at the museum, Dr Roger Smith, opens by discussing a relatively new sub-discipline, Taphonomy: A New Look at Old Stone Bones. "This takes a look at what happened to the skeletons of ancient creatures between their death and [...]

Rose’s Round-Up May 2002 No 100

FIRST FIVE-STAR VENUE IN KAROO When Ca' Serenissima opened its doors in Prince Albert a while ago, the Karoo welcomed a mega star. Now the Tourism Grading Council of South Africa has awarded the venue five stars. “The council makes this award only to venues of exceptional quality which offer luxurious accommodation that matches the best international standards with high quality furnishing, flawless service and meticulous guest care," says assessor Mark Goveia Ca' Serenissima, which means serene place, is the brain child of Bernd Borschel and Daniella Graziane. Bernd spent 17 years with the Sheraton Hotel Group before opting for [...]

Rose’s Round-Up April 2002 No 99

LAINGSBURG LAMB HAS THE EDGE When it comes to Karoo meat, master chef Chris van Wyk says there's nothing quite like Laingsburg lamb. Chris is so delighted with the Laingsburg product that he is taking a supply to Luxembourg later this year when he captains a team of 12 South African chefs taking part in the International Chefs Olympiad. "It has a uniquely delicious flavour. To my mind it is a cut above all other Karoo meat." Chris, who has had 12 years' experience as a hotel chef, now owns Amaqueta Foods in George. Here he prepares ready-made delicacies for [...]

Rose’s Round-Up March 2002 No 98

NEW APPROACH TO MARKETING Role-players in the Central Karoo were recently briefed on new strategies to streamline the tourism industry in the Western Cape Province. Sheryl Ozinsky, manager, Cape Town Tourism, Roger Carter, of the UK-based organisation TEAM (Tourism Education and Management), and Anneline Kriel, of Western Cape Tourism, discussed proposals for E-business information management systems and progress on the JMI (Joint Marketing Initiative), which is an attempt to create a common vision for five key economic development sectors: tourism, major events, film, investment and trade. "These strategies will result in closer links between the Mega City and the hinterland, [...]

Rose’s Round-Up February 2002 No 97

MAJOR FOSSIL FIND AT LAINGSBURG Ancient marine sediments of the Ecca Group rock layer near Laingsburg recently yielded an exciting surprise for geologists and palaeontologists working in the area. British palaeontologist Dr John Almond, of Nature Viva cc, discovered the fossil trackway of a gigantic water scorpion (eurypterid) in these 260-million-year-old rocks "This spectacular trace fossil consists of two parallel series of complex footprints. It is about one meter wide and seven meters in length, extending across the surface of a single bed. As such it is the largest trackway of an invertebrate (animal without backbone or other bony internal [...]

Rose’s Round-Up January 2002 No 96

NEW MINISTER NO STRANGER TO KAROO A man with strong hinterland ties has taken over the tourism helm in the Western Cape Province. Johan Gelderblom, former chairman of the Klein Karoo District Council and MP for the region, was appointed Minister of Agriculture, Tourism and Gambling on December 5, 2001. He replaced Mr Leon Marcowitz. Mr Gelderblom grew up in the Klein Karoo, matriculated at Ladismith and then acquired BA and BA Honours degrees in Public Administration at Stellenbosch University. After graduating, he moved to the then Transvaal to gain practical experience. There he also served on the Public Service [...]

Rose’s Round-Up November-December 2001 No 95

Rose’s Round-Up November-December 2001 No 95 CLOSER LOOK AT TOWNSHIP TOURISM Four members of the Mandlenkosi Township Route Forum of Beaufort West recently had an enriching tourism experience in Cape Town. A two-day educational trip, arranged by Western Cape Tourism Board, allowed Sylvia Dyum, Sylvia McKam, Keith Kedama and Clarence Metsing to take a closer look at tourism and meet people involved in township tourism promotion in the province. “Networking with organisations similar to our own has shown us that our problems are neither unique nor insurmountable”, says Sylvia Dyum. “We have gained a much wider perspective of tourism, a [...]

Rose’s Round-Up October 2001 No 94

KAROO PLANS SECOND TOWNSHIP ROUTE Residents of Prince Albert’s North End township have begun planning a tourist route. This follows the successful launch of the Kwa-Mandlenkosi Township Tourist Route in Beaufort West. “We have long wanted to share our history and culture with visitors to the town”, says Ds Cyril Afrika, chairman of the town’s development committee. “We plan to incorporate this route into existing tourist routes and trails in and around the town. We would like to introduce visitors to our talented crafters, invite them to spend a night or two in a North End B&B and to listen [...]

Rose’s Round-Up September 2001 No 93

BOER COMMANDANT HONOURED A century to the day after his capture near Prince Albert local Boer War enthusiasts honoured legendary Boer Commandant Gideon Scheepers. A memorial commemorating the 100th anniversary of Scheepers’s capture on Koppieskraal October 10, 1901, was unveilled by Rienus Koorts, grandson of the man who sheltered Scheepers. “This dynamic and controversial young Boer leader led British forces a merry chase across the plains of the Karoo”, said Lydia Barella, one of the organisers of the function. “Towards the end he became increasingly ill. This eventually led to his capture in a tiny room in one of the [...]

Rose’s Round-Up August 2002 No 103

IT'S HIGH NOON FOR THE RIVERINE RABBIT The odds are stacked against the riverine rabbit surviving another 10 years. It recently became South Africa’s most endangered mammal when its conservation status was raised to critical. "Its survival appears even more desperate than we previously believed," says Cape Nature Conservation researcher Chrizette Kleinhans. "These furry-footed little leaf-eaters, among the world's rarest animals, will disappear from the face of the earth within a decade unless drastic steps are immediately taken." The riverine rabbit is indigenous to the Central Karoo and found only in Beaufort West, Loxton, Carnarvon, Calvinia, Sutherland, Victoria West and [...]

Rose’s Round-Up August 2001 No 92

RIVERINE RABBIT MEETS THE PRESS The Riverine Rabbit Conservation Project was recently introduced to the media at Kirstenbosch. At this function members of each conservancy received a certificate of registration. “The aim of the launch was to raise awareness of the plight of this nocturnal animal and gain publicity for farmers committed to the survival of the species. The riverine rabbit is Africa’s only indigenous burrowing rabbit and one of 12 globally endangered rabbit species”, said Tony Marshall, regional manager Cape Nature Conservation. “Saving the species from extinction is extremely difficult because the rabbit’s natural habitat does not fall within [...]

Rose’s Round-Up July 2001 No 91

ALBERT’S MILL COMES BACK TO LIFE On a windy winter’s day recently, a group of people alongside a stream on the outskirts of Prince Albert enthusiastically discussed a lady, a launder and a lantern. The Friends of Albert’s Mill were in fact taking a serious look at restoration work in progress on the last surviving mill in town. The uninitiated soon discovered that the strange terms all referred to parts of a mill. In its heyday, Albert’s Mill was no rarity what with four others in the village. But it was closest to the Swartberg Mountains. The mill once supplied [...]

Rose’s Round-Up June 2001 No 90

IT’S ALL SYSTEMS GO IN KWA-MANDLENKOSI Tourism has sprouted wings in Kwa-Mandlenkosi. This was evident at the crowded inaugural meeting of a tourism planning committee recently at H M Dlikidla Primary School. Representatives from diverse organisations discussed the vital role of tourism within the Beaufort West community and the importance of the proposed route through the township. “Until fairly recently, most Africans had little interest in tourism”, said Siphiwe Piti, chairman of the Central Karoo Regional Tourism Organisation. “Developments in the new South Africa, however, have changed this. People now acknowledge tourism as the key to economic and infrastructure development [...]

Roses’ Round-Up May 2001 No 89

KAROO’S FIRST TOWNSHIP TOURISM ROUTE The first tourist route through a Karoo township is being created in Kwa-Mandlenkosi, Beaufort West. This was recently announced by Siphiwe Piti, chairman of the District Municipality Tourism Committee, when he appointed 12 tourism ambassadors at Mandlenkosi Secondary School. They are Gift Louw, Utombekhanya Lawrence, Athone Ngondo, Uthabiseng Manewe, Bongulethu Faas, Siyabulela Swartbooi, Andiswa Mzakala, Sandile Kohwe, Mzwamadode Visagie, Sipho Ngwenya, Uonzwakazi Lekanyane and Mucedisi Minye. All are in Grade 9. They volunteered to help with a community service project. Siphiwe presented the pupils with T-shirts and background information. The idea for the route developed [...]

Roses’ Round-Up April 2001 No 88

MINISTER CALLS FOR MORE RESEARCH Tourism was a powerful partnership, but only the surface had been scratched in efforts to create a closer working relationship between all sectors of the industry, the Western Cape Minister of Finance, Business Promotion and Tourism, Mr Leon Marcowitz, said when he addressed tourism roleplayers at an Oudtshoorn road show recently. “The image of tourism is still too fragmented. We also have far too many logos and structures”, he said. “Image is important, and so is marketing. We must focus and streamline our marketing approaches, spend more wisely and research the value of niche markets [...]