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Smallpox at the Cape

2018-10-16T12:27:37+02:00
Smallpox, introduced from the Orient, first made its appearance as an epidemic on Friday 13th 1713 when a crew member aboard a ship was infected with the disease. His clothes were taken out to be washed in the river near the castle which in turn contaminated the local drinking water. Another outbreak occurred later in 1755 and hit the Cape Settlement very hard. It ravaged all the Hottenot tribes, this together with the pressure of the fast expanding settlement, largely destroyed the tribal life of the Hottentots of the 18th Century. Many tribes were wiped out. Their numbers were reduced so much that their tribal organisation disintegrated and they were gradually taken into service as labourers, especially herdsmen by the local farmers.
Smallpox at the Cape2018-10-16T12:27:37+02:00

Index to Birth Registers in the Cape Town Archives

2018-11-03T21:15:31+02:00
Please note that although these registers are housed in the Cape Town Archives they are the property of the Home Affairs Western Cape. There is a 100 year embargo on access to these files by the public. To find out more on how these registers work, please consult the article on Birth Records in South Africa.
Index to Birth Registers in the Cape Town Archives2018-11-03T21:15:31+02:00

Birth Records in South Africa

2019-07-31T13:41:49+02:00
The Department of Home Affairs, in Pretoria, holds the most comprehensive compilation of personal resources for all South Africans. Access to the registers of births is closed for a period of a 100 years, to protect individuals, as stipulated by the office of origin. The general public may only view these records prior to 1908, and these are housed in the various archival repositories.
Birth Records in South Africa2019-07-31T13:41:49+02:00

Historical Graves in South Africa

2018-10-16T12:50:09+02:00
In the early days of the settlement at the Cape people of note were buried inside church buildings. Provision for a place of worship was at once made inside the Castle. Consequently the Rev. Joan (Johannes) van Arckel was laid to rest at that particular spot in the unfinished Castle in Jan. 1666. Only a fortnight earlier he himself had officiated at the laying of one of the four foundation stones of the new defence structure. A few months later the wife of Commander Zacharias Wagenaer was buried in the same ground; likewise Commander Pieter Hackius, who died on 30th November 1671.
Historical Graves in South Africa2018-10-16T12:50:09+02:00

Hidden Treasures in South Africa

2018-10-16T12:27:30+02:00
Many romantic tales are current of treasures lost and found in Southern Africa during the past five centuries. Some are based on fact and others on less reliable information. It is certain that notorious 16th- and 17th-century pirates careened their ships on islands off the coasts of East Africa and Madagascar, and stories about pirate hoards hidden by these desperadoes still circulate. Many ships carrying valuable cargoes, including treasure, have been wrecked off the coast of Southern and East Africa. Records reveal that from the middle of the 16th to the middle of the 17th century the Portuguese alone lost about 130 ships on the route to India, most of them on the treacherous African coast. High losses were also sustained by other maritime nations.
Hidden Treasures in South Africa2018-10-16T12:27:30+02:00

The Scots in South Africa

2018-10-16T12:27:24+02:00
Authors John M. MacKenzie and Nigel R. Dalziel epitomises their version of the Rainbow Nation with the vast array of Scots men and women who made South Africa their home. Their bright and cheerful clan tartans are a clear and defined representation of one of the original colours of our Rainbow Nation.
The Scots in South Africa2018-10-16T12:27:24+02:00